Tidal Energy Turbine Removal

September 17, 2011: Clean Current Staff and diving contractors return to remove the generator for the last time. The generator returns to Vancouver for a final analysis of structural details after exposure in the ocean over the last three years . After cleaning it is to be sent to the Museum of Science and technology in Ottawa, since it was the first ocean tidal generator to be built and deployed in Canada.

rmsept1711wideshot The location of the tidal current turbine was just to the north of the Middle islands in the centre of the Race Rocks Ecological Reserve .
rmsept17secnat Erik and Chris from Pearson College and Garry arrive on site in Second nature and moor alongside.
rmsept1711turbineup Dive boat and tug after the turbine is raised.

The process of removal starts with the barge Lena Marie positioned above the turbine waiting for slack water.

gfsept17waitatrr

 

 

 

gf2diversept1711 gfdiversept1711 rmsept17diver gfcrewsept1711
Divers prepare for descending to make preparations for lifting the generator Passing lines to the divers to stabilize the turbine for lifting A hard hat diver was deployed to remove the bolts fastening the generator to the piling.( RM photo) The crew waits on board the Lena Marie as the winch hook is lowered for attachment.
gfsept17below gfsept1711control gfchristendsept1711 gfcomeup1sept1711
First signs of the generator subsurface. Clean Current staff controlling the lifting. Chris Blondeau tending the hard hat diver. The generator breaks the surface
gfturbine2sept1711 gfsept1711turbine2 gfsept1711topside gfcfullview2sept1711
As it emerges, the fouling organisms from the last three years appear. View of the turbine as the tidal generator comes out of the water. The predominant macroalgae covering the structure was Laminaria groenlandica. Lifting operation complete
gfsept1711redalgae2 gfsept1711ryan gfsept17rrthru gfbdavidson
Several red algaes also grow on the structure. Ryan in the station boat and some curious whale watchers. Race Rocks through the generator as it heads back to Pearson College. Tug operator Bruce Davidson seen through the central hole of the generator.
gfsept17lenamarie gfsept17erik gfsept17atcollege gfsept1711redalgae
Moored back at the college awaiting transfer to Vancouver. Erik fastens straps to secure the blades for transport. Lester Pearson College docks with the generator docked alongside. Some images of the fouling organisms, part of the ecological succession on the turbine.
gfsept17sponge gfbarnac1 gfsept18orangebarnac1 gfsept18snail2
A yellow sponge, probably Mycale toparoki Very large barnacles that were not Balanus nubilus, but perhaps Semibalanus carriosus were common on the surface. A unique encrustation of hydroids on a single barnacle. Samples of the many hydroid species were taken by Garry for further identification in the lab. Interesting colour morphs of Nucella canaliculata

Images by Garry Fletcher

n conclusion: The Tidal Current Generator operation over the past six years has been an interesting experiment and a good demonstration of the potential power from tidal energy. The value to the Race Rocks program has been largely in the infrastructure that has been developed and installed and the potential for further research. The provision now of most of the energy needs by solar power was only made possible by the large bank of storage batteries provided by the project, the island energy building electrical infrastructure and the partnership with the BC Ministry of Mines and energy which were instrumental in providing the initial solar panels.

Only one student project was developed as a result of the turbine, and this was an analysis of an experiment by Clean Current of the power generation capacity of the generator by Connor Scheu and Wouter Zwart in 2009. In that report, the advantages of the exercise to the company are indicated.

However, due to problems with fibre optic cable malfunctioning and electrical cable leakage, the ability of the generator operate continuously and to provide significant power for the Integrated Energy system at Race Rocks was very limited. It did serve as an adequate base for testing structural materials, and Clean Current provided ongoing support to the Race Rocks program while the turbine was installed.

Garry Fletcher, Race Rocks Ecological Reserve warden

Tidal Current Energy Experiment Comes to an End.

September 17, 2011: Clean Current Staff and diving contractors return to Race Rocks to remove the generator for the last time. The generator returns to Vancouver for a final analysis of structural details after exposure in the ocean over the last three years . After cleaning,  it is to be sent to the Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa, since it was the first ocean tidal generator to be built and deployed in Canada.

“In conclusion: The Tidal Current Generator operation over the past six years has been an interesting experiment and a good demonstration of the potential power from tidal energy.  The added value to the availability of energy for Race Rocks  was however very disappointing.

The main value to the Race Rocks program has been in the infrastructure that has been developed and installed and the potential for further research. The provision now of most of the energy needs by solar power was only made possible by the large bank of storage batteries provided by the project, the island energy building electrical infrastructure and the partnership with the BC Ministry of Mines and energy which were instrumental in providing the initial solar panels.  Installation of further solar panels and upgrades by Lester Pearson College UWC has helped to ensure energy sustainability for Race Rocks.

–Garry Fletcher

 

Race Rocks Tidal Turbine Generator

GROUP 4 PROJECT- 2009Connor Scheu and Wouter Zwart April 2, 2009

Race Rocks Tidal Turbine Generator

Background:

Connor communicated with Russ Stothers of Clean Current for his project;

“Here is a simple synopsis of the project I will be doing this week. It is called a group four project (which pertains to the experimental science department here at the college), and the theme for everyones project is resource allocation/sustainability. Every student has to decide upon a project in which they will research something in this area. This usually involves the identification of a question, and then variables, presented in a lab format and accompanied by a presentation, but not overly formal.
For my project I really wanted to do something close to home, so I naturally thought of the tidal generator. I thought it would be so great if I could use this project to become more familiar with the project, and learn more about the field in general. It was for this reason that I wanted to contact you.

So basically what I would require for my project is some simple data, on the energy output of the generator, hopefully in relation to the tidal currents. From this I hope to create a simple relationship, proportional or not, which will help me identify the output and efficiency as current varies. This would satisfy the lab component of my project. The next component I would pursue would be the application of this knowledge. Simply from the results of the data and correlation I hope to receive, I would apply some simple reasoning to determine how effective or feasible such technology would be in other circumstances. That is, different magnitudes, in size and tidal extremes. An example of this would be; if the generator receives pique efficiency at the lowest speeds, then the technology would be more widely applicable to more general locations in the world, as opposed to selective areas of high tidal motion. Or if the energy benefits of higher speeds outweigh the selectivity of the projects.
This may be a rather ambitious goal, however this is a less formal project than others at the college (the extended essay is a full research paper) and as such it is OK to have lofty goals and then only achieve some of them in the allotted time. However I am sure that with your help I will be fully capable of receiving satisfactory results.
So I guess what I am asking of you would be the data I have previously outlined, in addition to the answering of some basic questions on the running of the turbine (included below this message).
This help would be most appreciated, I think it would be highly beneficial for the students of the college to have a little more information on the nature of this project. As it is so unique in design, important to global issues, and close to home. This is what my project will allow, as I will be presenting my findings to the student body towards the end of the week. I am very grateful for your generosity and aid
thank you again
Connor Scheu

Here are some of the questions which I have identified as what I think I need to know. But please feel free to include any relevant knowledge that you think would help. I am still quite unfamiliar with the project, and as such my questions may be a little vague. Also feel free to not answer any questions if they breach any kind of protocol or patent information.
1. Is this in fact just a simple turbine generator (similar to those in other hydro operations) placed in the presence of a fast moving current, or does it have certain defining characteristics.
No, it is significantly different from other hydro turbines. The requirement to extract power from a bi-directional flow means that the design of the turbine blade is very different. All standard hydro applications have blades that are designed to accept flow in one direction. Another major difference is that our machine is direct drive so that the speed of the generator is very slow compared to traditional applications which use a gearbox and a high speed generator.
2. What is the magnitude of energy created, when compared with other forms of green energy, is it relatively efficient etc.
The magnitude of the energy with respect to efficiency is very similar to wind in that the same basic laws of physics apply. The big difference/benefit is that the energy produced by tides is completely predictable whereas wind energy is statistically predictable over long periods of time but impossible to predict from one minute to the next.
I wouldn’t try to compare tidal energy to solar, biomass or other renewables. Each form of renewable energy is site specific.
3. Is this technology quite expensive to install, does it require very specific natural circumstances to operate effectively.
At the present time, yes. One of the biggest challenges facing the industry is to develop a system to cost effectively deploy, maintain and retrieve these devices. As you can understand from your experience at Race Rocks, the weather combined with the high tidal currents makes any deployment activity very difficult. The technology is best suited to sites that have peak tidal velocities between 2.5 m/s and 5.0 m/s. At current speeds less than 2 m/s there is very little energy in the flow and at speed greater than 5 m/s cavitation becomes a significant issue.
4. Is it true that this is one of only four projects like this in the world, and if so, what are the natures of the others. That is how do they differ, or are similar. Also, what immediate repercussions could this technology have on the world if proven to be effective.
Clean Current’s principal competitors are based in Europe. There are many competitors but the ones Clean Current considers threats are:
Marine Current Turbines is the most advanced with the deployment of a 1.2MW unit at Strangford Lough in 2008. Clean Current believes the challenges of this system compared to the Clean Current technology are as follows:
This unit has a high capital cost due to the complexity and large number of moving parts (gearbox, variable pitch blades, mechanism to raise and lower rotor).
The structure is surface piercing and therefore a navigational hazard to recreational and commercial traffic.
The exposed rotating blades pose a threat to fish, marine life and divers.
The above water structure must be designed to survive extreme weather such as hurricanes and tsunamis.
The turbine is sensitive to flow directional changes as it does not have an upstream augmenter to redirect the flow.
The system is complex and not applicable in deep water applications which comprise the majority of the world’s resources.

Open Hydro is a well financed company based in Ireland.  They have deployed a 6m prototype of their technology at the EMEC testing centre. They are also planning to deploy a second unit in the Bay of Fundy in the summer of 2009. Clean Current believes the challenges of this system compared to the Clean Current technology are as follows:
The fixed pitch blades are similar to flat plates and therefore have a poor efficiency. Clean Current’s blades are also fixed pitch but use a highly efficient hydrodynamic shape.
The overall efficiency of this unit is much lower than Clean Current’s turbine due to the lack of a power augmenting outer duct.
The lack of a central support makes the turbine more susceptible to vibration caused by the turbulent tidal flow The turbine cannot compensate effectively for flow directional changes as it does not have an upstream augmenter to redirect the flow.
The design information currently available does not indicate the use of a maintenance module potentially resulting in significant downtime.

5. Is this technology a great improvement on the other forms of tidal generation, which typically involve the use of dikes and grand structures.
The traditional barrage types of technology have large environmental impacts. The type of tidal generation that we are promoting does not have the same effect on the ecosystem; however, it is important to note that barrage types of technology can extract greater amounts of energy as all of the flow is forced through the turbine.
6. What are some of the typical pitfalls in this kind of project, some main difficulties either with engineering, or other aspects.
Some of the main challenges from the engineering side are as follows:
Deployment in fast moving waters (as discussed above)
Operation of bearings in a submerged environment
Operation of an electrical machine in a submerged environment.
Transmission of the power to shore
Achieving maintenance free operation for 5+ years.
Prevent bio-fouling
Some of the non-technical issues include:
Regulatory approvals from organizations such as DFO on the perceived impact on marine life
Negotiations with existing users of area (fisherman, tug operators, commercial vessels) to accommodate the installation of a tidal farm

I think these are sufficient to give me a basic comprehension of what this project is about. I will also make an effort to research what I can on my own, I just thought I would make use of you as a resource if possible.
thanks again
Connor Scheu
Questions:
1. I am still unsure as to the nature of the “upstream augmenter.” I know that it allows for the turbine to compensate for flow direction changes, I am just not sure how it does this, or what it is really.
The curved shape of the augmentor redirects the flow so that the water is directly aligned with the turbine rotor. Without an augmentor, the flow would intersect the rotor at an acute angle which would result in reduced power output. You can also think of the augmentor as functioning similar to a sail on a sailboat. When the sail is trimmed properly, the wind follows the shape of the sail. We have designed the augmentor so that for flow deviations, the water follows the surface of the augmentor.
2. The transmission of power to shore, is done by means of an underwater cable? Is this the only means by which this can be done, and is this a very difficult procedure?
The only way to bring significant power ashore is through the use of a subsea cable. The challenges of this technology are ensuring the cable is adequately protected on the seabed. Due to the high current environment, the cable is very susceptible to damage through abrasion on the rocky seabed. Another challenge is electrical connectors. The majority of the connectors available in industry are not designed for both high power and long life. A specific design for tidal generators is required.
3. You mentioned the biological impact, I understand how this turbine is significantly better than the barrage designs, and even than the open bladed design of the other company. I presume that it is fairly safe (simply by looking at the design) because large animals will avoid the turbine, and smaller fish may pass through without harm. Is this somewhere in the right ballpark. Are there any other concerns for the local wildlife?
You thoughts are inline with ours. I think your best source for an opinion here is probably Chris.
4. It seems to me as if you guys are the best outfit going, would you consider yourselves the world leaders in this technology, or at least one of the most promising companies.
Thanks for the comments! Yes, we believe that we are one of the leading technologies. Having said this; however, there is still significant work to be performed to make this product commercial.
5. You mentioned that the majority of the world’s resources are located in deep water, what kind of limitations does your technology have on depth? Are there a multitude of possible locations for this technology around the world, what would be some of the ideal circumstances?
When we refer to deep water, we are referring to 40-65m of water. Our technology is well suited to these depths. As you go deeper, the greatest challenge will be installation. The paragraph below is an excerpt from our assessment of the market.
Global demand for electric power is expected to increase from 14.8 trillion kilowatt hours in 2003 to 30.1 trillion kilowatt hours by 2030, according to the Energy Information Administration. To meet this demand, the International Energy Agency estimates that investments in new generating capacity will exceed $4 trillion in the period from 2003 to 2030, of which $1.6 trillion will be for renewable energy generation equipment.
A variety of factors are contributing to the development of renewable energy systems that capture energy from replenishable natural resources, such as ocean currents and waves, flowing water, wind and sunlight and convert it into electricity. These factors include the rising cost of fossil fuels, dependence on energy from foreign sources, environmental concerns, government incentives and infrastructure constraints.
Tidal energy is positioned favourably to capitalize on the growing demand for renewable energy. It is expected that tidal energy generation costs for large sites will be competitive with other renewable energy sources. In addition to having the potential to be a very large source of competitive renewable energy, tidal energy is a very predictable source of energy, is not affected by climate change and has a minimal environmental footprint.
Clean Current expects early adoption of tidal power generation will be driven by those countries and regions that are looking to satisfy government or regulatory renewable energy mandates and that have potential tidal energy resources situated near populations with high electricity demand and relatively high power prices. A number of communities and utilities in the United Kingdom, North America and Asia are currently pursuing tidal energy feasibility studies, and are expected to be some of the first regions to pursue tidal farms when a proven commercial technology becomes available.
Recent government sponsored initiatives have included tidal resource assessments from leading engineering consulting firms, Black & Veatch Corporation (“Black & Veatch”) (United Kingdom) and Triton Consultants Ltd. (“Triton Consultants”)(Canada), respectively. Black & Veatch estimated the world’s “Technically Extractable Resource” to be 155 TWh per annum, including 18 TWh  At an average capacity factor of 26%, this?per annum in the United Kingdom. translates to installed capacity of approximately 67,400 MW for the world and 7,800 MW for the United Kingdom.
In Canada, Triton Consultants assessed the tidal energy potential at approximately 42,000 MW. Approximately 7,000 MW of this potential resource is located in accessible regions on the east and west coasts of Canada.? Clean Current estimates that approximately 15% to 20% of the power in the accessible regions is currently extractable, resulting in 9.2 to 12.3 TWh per annum of electrical energy. At an average capacity factor of 26%, this translates to installed capacity of approximately 4,000 to 5,500 MW for Canada.
1. Source: Phase II, UK tidal Stream Energy Resource Assessment; Black & Veatch
2. Source: Canada Ocean Energy Atlas (Phase 1) Potential Tidal Current Energy Resources Analysis Background; Triton Consultants

Again, I am very grateful for all of your help, I read on the company site that one of the mandates of this project was to aid in the education of the students of Pearson College. I think this is very thoughtful, and says something about the quality of your company, and of course, its employees.
Purpose: To determine the correlation between the rates of current flow through the channel and the power produced by the generator, and then apply said correlation to real world applications.

Procedure: Experimentation performed by Clean Current and its employees

Data:

Diameter of Turbine m 3.5
Frontal Area m2 9.62
Density of Seawater Kg/m3 1024
Current Speed Blade Tip Speed RPM Power in water Efficiency Power Extracted
(m/s) (m/s)   (kW) (%) (kW)
         
1.0 3.9 21.4 4.9 28.2% 1.4
1.1 4.3 23.5 6.6 28.9% 1.9
1.2 4.7 25.7 8.5 29.5% 2.5
1.3 5.1 27.8 10.8 30.1% 3.3
1.4 5.5 30.0 13.5 30.7% 4.1
1.5 5.9 32.1 16.6 31.2% 5.2
1.6 6.3 34.2 20.2 31.7% 6.4
1.7 6.7 36.4 24.2 32.2% 7.8
1.8 7.1 38.5 28.7 32.6% 9.4
1.9 7.5 40.7 33.8 33.0% 11.1
2.0 7.8 42.8 39.4 33.3% 13.1
2.1 8.2 44.9 45.6 33.6% 15.3
2.2 8.6 47.1 52.5 33.9% 17.8
2.3 9.0 49.2 59.9 34.2% 20.5
2.4 9.4 51.4 68.1 34.4% 23.4
2.5 9.8 53.5 77.0 34.5% 26.6
2.6 10.2 55.6 86.6 34.7% 30.0
2.7 10.6 57.8 97.0 34.8% 33.7
2.8 11.0 59.9 108.1 34.8% 37.7
2.9 11.4 62.1 120.1 34.9% 41.9
3.0 11.8 64.2 133.0 34.9% 46.4
3.1 12.2 66.3 146.8 34.8% 51.1
3.2 12.5 68.5 161.4 34.6% 55.8
3.3 12.9 70.6 177.0 34.3% 60.8
3.4 13.3 72.8 193.6 33.8% 65.4
3.5 13.7 74.9 211.2 32.6% 68.9

 

These graphs are representative of the data presented in the table. They indicate the relationship between rate of current flow in meters per second to a variety of other variables (Blade Speed, RPM, Theoretical Energy, Efficiency, and Produced Energy).
 bladevscurrspeed
  This graph shows how there is a perfectly linear relationship between the current speed, and the rotational speed of the blade tips. This is self evident as it is in fact the current that drives this motion. It is notable however that there is virtually no impact from friction or other environmental forces. There is a uniform constant (value 3.9) which relates blade tip speed to current speed for this model of generator.rpmvscurrspeed

This graph shoes much the same relationship as the first graph, albeit with a different constant. This is simply because the blade speed has a direct relationship with the revolutions per minute. This value is dependent on the diameter of the turbine, and thus the length of the blades.

poweerinwatvscurrspeed

This graph shows the relationship between the theoretical value of the power in the water, and the current speed.

This value is derived from the formula: P = Cp x 0.5 x ρ x A x V3

Where:

Cp is the turbine coefficient of performance

P = the power generated (in watts)

ρ = the density of the water (seawater is 1024 kg/m3)

A = the sweep area of the turbine (in m2)

V3 = the velocity of the flow cubed (i.e. V x V x V)efficvscurrentspeed

This graph shows the relationship between the overall efficiency of the turbine, and the rate of current flow. This is derived from dividing the actual power produced by the theoretical power produced. It can be seen that as current flow reaches its upper limits, the device begins to rapidly lose efficiency. This has implications on the applicability of this product. The peak efficiency is 2.76 m/s, found as follows:

The estimated equation for the slope of the graph is -0.0215x2 + 0.1187x + 0.1829 using a graphing program.

The derivation of this line is: -0.043x + 0.1187

When this equals zero, the slope is zero, which is the point of greatest efficiency (maximum point)

This is 2.76 m/s, the power received at this point is 35.5 kW

powscurrspeedThis graph displays the actual values for energy produced, when compared to current flow. It can be viewed as a combination of the efficiency and ideal power graphs. This knowledge is integral to understanding the ideal speed. It can be clearly seen that the relation is quite exponential, with higher speeds yielding much greater results. However it is also known that the efficiency curve takes a greater role at roughly the end of the data, an extension of this graph would show an eventual plateau. Using this knowledge we can conclude that the ideal current speed for this turbine is somewhere in the region of 3.5 m/s.

Analysis/Conclusion:

From the data we have developed a very clear and meaningful relationship between the rate of current flow, and various aspects of the turbine generator on Race Rocks. We have noted that there is a perfectly linear relationship between current speed and the speeds of the blade tips, as well as the RPM of the turbine itself. We have shown that there is an exponential increase in theoretical power contained in the water and current flow, as well as the exponential decrease in efficiency as these values increase. Finally we have shown the actual relationship between current speed and energy output, which can be viewed as a compilation of the efficiency and theoretical power graphs.

This data is incredibly useful in the analysis of this device, and its applicability. The point where the most energy is obtained most efficiently has great impacts on how the technology is used. From our data it is clear that this point is towards the upper range of the current flow, about 3.5 m/s. For after this point the efficiency of the system decreases dramatically. Before this point, the exponential increase in energy produced makes the efficiency loss acceptable.

Further Connections:

I have learned that the average energy output for this turbine for one day is 300kWh, which equates to an average energy production of approximately 12.5 kW. This information may be applied to any power consumption grid, in order to determine the feasibility of using these turbines on a larger scale.

One house at Pearson College uses approximately 600 kWh of energy per day. Using this data, it is possible to conclude that two of these generators could provide enough power for one house. That is power for forty-two individuals, provided entirely by the sea; perfectly green, completely sustainable, and 100% predictable energy.

It should also be considered that this device is still a prototype, and is constantly being refined to the point where it may be commercialized and applied on a larger scale.

 

Race Rocks Tidal Turbine Generator

Connor Scheu and Wouter Zwart April 2, 2009 . Race Rocks Tidal Turbine GeneratorUWCpearsoncollegeicon

Background:

Ed note: Connor communicated with Russ Stothers of Clean Current for his project;

“Here is a simple synopsis of the project I will be doing this week. It is called a group four project (which pertains to the experimental science department here at the college), and the theme for everyones project is resource allocation/sustainability. Every student has to decide upon a project in which they will research something in this area. This usually involves the identification of a question, and then variables, presented in a lab format and accompanied by a presentation, but not overly formal. Continue reading

Integrated Tidal Current Demonstration Project at Race Rocks

tidalturbinrfrom:http://www.spok.dk/seminar/CA-OE-2007-Race%20Rocks_22.pdf

or for the internal pdf version on this website: See the powerpoint presentation at: CA-OE-2007-Race Rocks_22

Integrated Tidal Current Demonstration Project at:
Race Rocks, British Columbia, Canada
Gouri Bhuyan, Powertech Labs Inc
Glen Darou – Clean Current Power Systems Inc.
Christian Blondeau, Lester B. Pearson College
Mark Edmunds,- Xantrex Technology
Max Larson- Triton Consulting
Gary Bouwman-  AMEC
European Commission Coordinated Action on Ocean Energy (CA-OE)
Workshop on Environmental, Economics, Development Policy, and Promotion of
Opportunities, Copenhagen, Denmark 26-27 April 2007

 

Tidal Current Energy Demonstration Project: Renewable Energy for Race Rocks

Energy Minister.jpg ENCANA Media Coverage of this story in the Pearson College LINK
Press Release:
ENCANA Partners to enable Pearson College- ENCANA – Clean Current Tidal Power Demonstration Project at Race Rocks Feb 25, 2005
Complete Video Coverage of the Announcement at Pearson College TV and Print Media coverage
of the event
BACKGROUNDER: Link to the news release

Stephen HarperPrime Minister Stephen Harper visits Race Rocks and Pearson College for an “ecoEnergy announcement”. January 19, 2007
tidalturbinrPresentation at the European Commission Coordinated Action on Ocean Energy (CA-OE)Workshop on Environmental, Economics, Development Policy, and Promotion of Opportunities, Copenhagen, Denmark 26-27 April 2007

 

 


Environmental Impact Monitoring of the Tidal Energy Project.

 

 

 

Video on Tidal Turbine Project

Video on the Pearson College, EnCana, Clean Current Tidal Power Demonstration Project at Race Rocks
END of Tidal Energy project and removal of Turbine

 

 

Cable Laying Aug 2006

Update on Activities at Race Rocks on the Pearson College- ENCANA – Clean Current Tidal Power Demonstration Project and the Integrated Energy Project.

 

 

link to Taco Niet

History and Background Information
on the Alternate Energy Project at Race Rocks.

 

 

abiotic file

Tidal Currents as an Abiotic Factor In the Race Rocks Ecosystem

 

 

J de F currents

Strait of Juan de Fuca currents and tides Link

 

 

 

oldenergyTraditional Energy Generation
By Diesel Oil at Race Rocks .
Environmental Impacts of the Existing Diesel Powered Generator

 

 

 

Solar energy investigation

The Solar Energy Component of the Integrated Energy System at Race Rocks

 

 

 

Davis Weather Instrument

the Environmental Data page with links to weather station and underwater physical factors.

 

 

 

 

powscurrspeed-300x213

Connor Scheu and Wouter Zwart April 2, 2009 the outputs of energy from the system.

 

 

turbineinspectVideo on turbine inspection before removal, Jun,2011

 

 

 

Artists Concept

 

Integrated Energy Project Update

With the Pearson College – EnCana – Clean Current Tidal Power Demonstration Project at Race Rocks now fully underway, we are seeing a variety of activities in the preparation for the tidal generator and other components of the Integrated Energy System at Race Rocks. Look for the most recent updates at the top of this page.
A blue background relates to the tidal components, a yellow background refers to the solar components. The white background represents the Power Storage and Conditioning Component. The green background links to the Environmental sensor components of the project.

gfturbine2sept1711

On September 17, 2011the Tidal energy generator experiment was ended and the generator was removed.

 tanknpanel tidal energy turbine fouling on turbine
In the late summer of 2009, Pearson College installed six new 165 watt solar panels to add to the existing bank of 38 panels on the energy centre. Redeployment of Tidal Energy Turbine, October, 2008 April, 2007.The tidal energy turbine is raised to change the bearings which had been deteriorating faster than expected.
mounting bolts for solar panels
solar panels
Cementing anchor bolts to the roof January 17, 2007 Installation of Solar Panels
January 25, 2007

Continue reading

Environmental protection of the Ecological Reserve with the Installation of the Tidal current Generator at Race Rocks

This file provides information on the process used to ensure environmental protection of the Ecological Reserve with the installation of the tidal current generator at Race Rocks.

Contents:

BACKGROUND REFERENCES:
This file provides information on the process used to ensure environmental protection of the Ecological Reserve with the installation of the tidal current generator at Race Rocks.

Contents:

BACKGROUND REFERENCES:

1.Permit Application for Research on the Ecological Reserve 2004

2. Appendix A– Energy at Race Rocks : The problems and Solutions:

3. Environmental Impact of Tidal Current Energy Generation on Marine Mammals: Addendum to Clean Current Permit Application: Garry Fletcher.

4. References on the effects of Tidal Energy Generation on Marine Life:

5. Information for the Race Rocks Advisory Board on Alternate Energy Developments In the Race Rocks Ecological Reserve: 2004.

6.Outline of Expectations for a Baseline Study and Follow-up monitoring of the Current Energy Project at Race Rocks:

7. Video of the type of organisms that grow in the area of the turbine site.

8. Pam and Jason of Archipelago Marine Document life forms along the cable path.

9. Video of impact of Concrete Anchor Placement for the Tidal Energy Project

10. Environmental Monitoring at Race Rocks Ecological Reserve related to the Pearson College-Encana-Clean Current Tidal Power Demonstration Project by Pam Thuringer of Archipelago Marine, 2006.

11. Environmental Impact of the Diesel Energy Power generation System at Race Rocks

12. Preliminary Environmental Screening for: Expansion of generator shed for battery storage

:13. Preliminary Environmental Screening for: Installation of Electrical Cable and Conduits at Race Rocks

14. Preliminary Environmental Screening for: Installation of the Piling for the tidal energy generator:. Continue reading

Tide turns for power, and for young minds

Tide turns for power, and for young minds

Louise Dickson
Times Colonist (Victoria)
26-Feb-2005

They’re harnessing the tide at Pearson College to keep the lights burning at Race Rocks.

Turbulent tides tumbling by Race Rocks ecological reserve near Metchosin will test how well a new tidal turbine generator stands up to the harsh West Coast environment.

Pearson, which brings together students from around the world for studies and to serve the community, expects the tides to help produce more than enough electricity to replace two diesel generators and provide power to the college’s marine education centre on Great Race Rock Island by 2006.

“The project, the first of its kind in Canada, could prove the value of new technology over time and it could be very beneficial to coastal peoples around the world,” Stuart Walker, director of Lester B. Pearson College of the Pacific, said Friday.

The $4-million project is a partnership between Pearson College, EnCana Corporation of Canada, and Clean Current Power Systems of Vancouver. EnCana, the largest producer and developer of natural gas in North America, is investing $3 million in the project from its environmental innovation fund.

Clean Current developed and built the prototype of a tidal turbine generator which harnesses the power of ocean currents to produce electricity.

Testing will take place in about 15 metres of water, off Race Rocks, about 10 nautical miles southwest of Victoria. The tidal turbine generator, which functions like an underwater windmill, will be anchored to the seabed, and cables will carry away the electricity it generates.

When the tide flows, the blades turn, explained Glen Darou, president of Clean Current. The blades have a permanent magnet attached to them. When the magnet passes by coils, the coils create electricity. The turbine works when currents are flowing in either direction.

According to Darou, the project will have minimal impact on the environment.

“We will have to disturb the bottom of the ocean with the turbine and cables but it’s a fast-growing marine en-

vironment and will recover quickly,” he said.

“Anything that can swim in the tidal currents will not swim into the turbine, it will swim around it. But something that floats through like a jellyfish could actually go into it. That’s the size of the risk.”

The prototype has been tested in fresh water, but Clean Current has to make sure its turbine generator works in saltwater.

“Now we have to prove its operability and maintenance,” said Darou.

Clean Current will know in about 18 months how the model and its one moving part — the rotor — stands up to corrosion in a harsh marine environment. The turbine will be monitored by underwater cameras. The prototype being tested is 3.5-metres in diameter and can produce enough electricity for 10 houses. Full scale models will be 14 metres in diameter and produce enough electricity for 250 houses.

Darou envisions the day when there will be big underwater tidal turbine generator farms with up to 800 turbines that will produce electricity around the world.

“The end of the dream will be our technology licensed around the world and applied in tidal environments all over the world. It’s seeing the technology used and replacing fossil fuels,” he said.

The project will run at Race Rocks for five years. After that, Clean Current will sell the prototype to either B.C. Parks or Pearson College for $1.

Clean Current still needs to come up with $1 million to pay for the project, Darou said. He expected the money will come from private investors and the federal government.

The project will help the company and the province evaluate the future of this technology, said B.C. Energy and Mines Minister Richard Neufeld.

Alternative energy will change how we consume fossil fuels over time, said Neufeld. “This is brand new, so let’s give it time to see how it works. Let’s give it time to see (how) technology can change it to make it more efficient.,” said Neufeld.

Media Coverage of the Tidal Energy Announcement

See Below for entries from the :

  • Times Colonist : February 26, 2005
  • Okanagan Weekender Sunday, February 27, 2005
  • B.C. News Roundup: Feb. 26 Broadcast News Saturday, February 26, 2005
  • Goldstream Gazette Mar 03,2005
  • The Province July 24, 2005. Also in The Times Colonist, July 26, 2005

Pearson, which brings together students from around the world for studies and to serve the community, expects the tides to help produce more than enough electricity to replace two diesel generators and provide power to the college’s marine education centre on Great Race Rock Island by 2006. “The project, the first of its kind in Canada, could prove the value of new technology over time and it could be very beneficial to coastal peoples around the world,” Stuart Walker, director of Lester B. Pearson College of the Pacific, said Friday. The $4-million project is a partnership between Pearson College, EnCana Corporation of Canada, and Clean Current Power Systems of Vancouver. EnCana, the largest producer and developer of natural gas in North America, is investing $3 million in the project from its environmental innovation fund. Clean Current developed and built the prototype of a tidal turbine generator which harnesses the power of ocean currents to produce electricity. Testing will take place in about 15 metres of water, off Race Rocks, about 10 nautical miles southwest of Victoria. The tidal turbine generator, which functions like an underwater windmill, will be anchored to the seabed, and cables will carry away the electricity it generates.When the tide flows, the blades turn, explained Glen Darou, president of Clean Current. The blades have a permanent magnet attached to them. When the magnet passes by coils, the coils create electricity. The turbine works when currents are flowing in either direction. According to Darou, the project will have minimal impact on the environment. “We will have to disturb the bottom of the ocean with the turbine and cables but it’s a fast-growing marine environment and will recover quickly,” he said. “Anything that can swim in the tidal currents will not swim into the turbine, it will swim around it. But something that floats through like a jellyfish could actually go into it. That’s the size of the risk.” The prototype has been tested in fresh water, but Clean Current has to make sure its turbine generator works in saltwater. “Now we have to prove its operability and maintenance,” said Darou. Clean Current will know in about 18 months how the model and its one moving part — the rotor — stands up to corrosion in a harsh marine environment. The turbine will be monitored by underwater cameras. The prototype being tested is 3.5-metres in diameter and can produce enough electricity for 10 houses. Full scale models will be 14 metres in diameter and produce enough electricity for 250 houses. Darou envisions the day when there will be big underwater tidal turbine generator farms with up to 800 turbines that will produce electricity around the world. “The end of the dream will be our technology licensed around the world and applied in tidal environments all over the world. It’s seeing the technology used and replacing fossil fuels,” he said. The project will run at Race Rocks for five years. After that, Clean Current will sell the prototype to either B.C. Parks or Pearson College for $1. Clean Current still needs to come up with $1 million to pay for the project, Darou said. He expected the money will come from private investors and the federal government. The project will help the company and the province evaluate the future of this technology, said B.C. Energy and Mines Minister Richard Neufeld. Alternative energy will change how we consume fossil fuels over time, said Neufeld. “This is brand new, so let’s give it time to see how it works. Let’s give it time to see (how) technology can change it to make it more efficient.,” said Neufeld. 
Tide Turns for Power, and for Young Minds: Pearson College, Partners Apply Current Thinking Times Colonist (Victoria) Saturday, February 26, 2005 Page: A1 / FRONT Section: News Byline: Louise Dickson Source: Times Colonist<They’re harnessing the tide at Pearson College to keep the lights burning at Race Rocks. Turbulent tides tumbling by Race Rocks ecological reserve near Metchosin will test how well a new tidal turbine generator stands up to the harsh West Coast environment.

College Harnessing Waves to Power Ecological Reserve Okanagan Weekender Sunday, February 27, 2005 Page: A2 Section: West Byline: Dateline: VICTORIA Source: Canadian Press VICTORIA (CP) — They’re harnessing the tide at Pearson College on Vancouver Island to keep the lights burning at Race Rocks ecological reserve. Turbulent tides tumbling by Race Rocks will test how well a new tidal turbine generator stands up to the harsh west coast environment. The project is expected to produce more than enough electricity to replace two diesel generators and provide power to the suburban Metchosin college’s marine education centre on Great Race Rock Island by 2006. “The project, the first of its kind in Canada, could prove the value of new technology over time, and it could be very beneficial to coastal peoples around the world,” Stuart Walker, director of Lester B. Pearson College of the Pacific, said Friday. The $4-million project is a partnership between Pearson College, Calgary-based EnCana Corp., and Clean Current Power Systems of Vancouver. EnCana, the largest producer and developer of natural gas in North America, is investing $3 million in the project from its environmental innovation fund. Clean Current developed and built the prototype of a tidal turbine generator that harnesses the power of ocean currents to produce electricity. Testing will take place in about 15 metres of water, off Race Rocks, about 10 nautical miles southwest of Victoria. The tidal turbine generator, which functions like an underwater windmill, will be anchored to the seabed. When the tide flows, the blades turn. They have a permanent magnet attached that passes by coils, which create electricity. The electricity passes through a cable on the seabed into a facility where it is conditioned. The turbine works when currents are flowing in either direction.

CollegeReseachers Testing Tidal Power B.C. news roundup: Feb. 26 Broadcast News Saturday, February 26, 2005Pearson College near Victoria is testing the waters of tidal power with a new turbine generator to run the Race Rocks ecological preserve. It’s a $4 million experiment to see how well the new turbine stands up to the harsh west-coast environment. If it works, the unit will replace two diesel generators by March 2006. The project is being sponsored Calgary-based energy producer EnCana Corporation and Clean Current Power Systems of Vancouver.

Project tests Race Rocks’ Tidal Power Goldstream News Gazette  Mar 02 2005, By Rick Stiebel   The tides of change are turning in Metchosin.  Lester B. Pearson College of the Pacific, Encana Corporation and Clean  Current Power Systems announced an innovative partnership Friday to  build a free-stream tidal power generator, the first of its kind in  Canada, at the Race Rocks Ecological Reserve.  The project, made possible by a $3 million investment from Encana’s  Environmental Innovation Fund, involves replacing two diesel-powered  generators at Race Rocks that supply power for Pearson’s marine  education centre with a tidal turbine generator, built by Clean  Current Power Systems.  The remaining funding for the $4 million project is expected to come  from private investors and the federal government.  The generator is scheduled to begin producing power by 2006.  The turbine generator has only one moving part, the rotor assembly  that contains permanent magnets. The turbine, anchored to the ocean  floor in about 15 metres of water, operates like an underwater  windmill with cables that carry away the energy it produces.  “This Canadian technology is simple, efficient and environmentally  friendly,” Clean Current president Glen Darou said at the Feb. 25  announcement at Pearson College.

A prototype, which has been tested in fresh water, will be scrutinized  closely over the next 18 months to see how it holds up to corrosion  resulting from a marine, saltwater environment.  “This is a terrific project for Pearson College, in that it supports  our goal of making the ecological reserve a showcase for alternative,  low impact technologies such as tidal power,” said Pearson College  director Stuart Walker.  Pearson College staff and students played a major role in having the  site at Race Rocks, about three nautical miles from the Metchosin  school. Race Rocks was declared an ecological reserve in 1980.  The college is dedicated to protecting the marine ecosystems within  the reserve, while increasing awareness about marine systems,  ecological reserves and environmental issues, Walker said.

 Encana Corporation CEO president Gwyn Morgan said his company is  “pleased to be a partner in a first-class, alternative energy  project.”  “Our investment in this B.C. based unconventional environmental and  power technology reflects our desire to tangibly encourage innovative  energy solutions.”  Encana is one of North America’s largest independent oil and natural  gas companies, with an enterprise value of about $34 billion US.

 B.C. Minister of Energy and Mines Richard Neufeld praised the three  parties involved in the partnership.  “The project certainly looks environmentally sound,” said Don McLaren,  area supervisor for B.C. Parks. “It will not only remove the diesel  generators on Race Rocks, but greatly reduce the noise factor.”  McLaren said the project will put Pearson College and B.C. Parks in “a  greener position, and help us and Pearson a lot.”



THE PEARSON COLLEGE-ENCANA-CLEAN CURRENT TIDAL POWER DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT RACE ROCKS
ANNOUNCEMENT FEB 25, 2005

TV: CH News Channel Coverage of the Event

CBC-tidalenergyCBC Coverage: Wringing Power From Race Rocks