Oystercatcher Cam – Race Rocks Ecological Reserve

 

Recently James and Max from the It Department at Lester Pearson College have set up a live camera to follow the development of one of the Black Oystercatcher nests with two eggs in the Race Rocks Ecological Reserve. The camera had infrared night vision, so this samople of night behaviour was captured, see the video below taken at 11:30 PM June 6 2016
Other references and images of Black Oystercatchers at Race Rocks can be found at these links:

2bloy BLOY headshot
The Black Oystercatcher with more videos and pictures in the Gallery of the Race Rocks Taxonomy All entries on this website tagged with Black Oystercatcher:

Elephant Seal Birth part 3–Male Interacts

This video shows the first contact and interaction between the pup and Chunk.

Below, more interactions between pup, mother and Chunk. The pup is starting to be more vocal.

Other birth videos:

See Elephant Seal Birth part 1- start and end of birth
See Elephant Seal Birth part 2
See Elephant Seal Birth part 3 wide angle
See Elephant Seal Birth part 4

 

Elephant Seal Birth Videos 2–Mother and Pup Interactions

Pup and mother vocalizations, Chunk is heard vocalizing out of the frame.  A seagull feasts on the nutrient dense placenta.


Mother and pup close up, vocalizations.


The pup is looking to nurse but seems like it hasn’t figured out the mechanics of it yet.


Continue on to the next post for complete birth sequence.

See Elephant Seal Birth part 1- start and end of birth
See Elephant Seal Birth part 2
See Elephant Seal Birth part 3
See Elephant Seal Birth part 4

Elephant Seal Birth Videos –The delivery


Above, the mother elephant seal is having contractions. The pups nose and head start to become visible at the end of the clip.

The pup is born, steaming in the sun and the mother starts calling to it.

See Elephant Seal Birth part 1- start and end of birth
See Elephant Seal Birth part 2
See Elephant Seal Birth part 3 wide angle
See Elephant Seal Birth part 4

 

Birds Cleaning up Afterbirth of the Elephant Seal.

Nothing goes wasted in an ecological system. A few hours after the birth of the baby elephant seal, Thayer’s Gulls, Ravens and Black Turnstones came by to get a bit of rich protein for the placenta.

Early morning of the Birth of the Elephant Seal

In the early morning just after the birth of the Elephant seal pup, Alex was able to record behaviours of the mother and Pup. Gulls started to go after the placenta, opposed by the mother.
This video was made from clips taken between 0814 hours and 0830 hours.

Shooting the Elephant seal Images

Alex uses a Pro-cam video camera at Race Rocks to take video and some still images  of the Elephant seals close up. In this sequence, taken on the day after the birth of the elephant seal. He places the camera and then leaves, capturing an interesting sequence as the pup tries to find milk and the Male “Chunk” starts to get aggressive. Click on the small icon in the lower right for a full screen image

Vocalization of Elephant Seal Mother and Pup

 

Vocalization of mother and pup are essential shortly after the birth of an elephant seal to  establish a bond and for recognition of each other if separated in the pupping colony. The first video was taken on the afternoon of January 14, day 1 the pup can be seen looking for food, but she had not started to nurse yet., The second  video was taken on the evening of January 14,  2014 the day the elephant seal was born at  Race Rocks.

Videos by the Ecoguardian, Alex Fletcher.

 

 

Sealion infusion

Wardens’s report by Garry Fletcher contd.

In early morning calm –and clear with no wind– by 1115 hrs it was pouring rain. Predictable from the look of the barometer . The weather fluctuated all day from rain to sun with a rainbow and back to rain. Sea lion numbers are still building and one more elephant seal joined the elephant seal group  by the boathouse last night . So this is what it looked and sounded like this morning :

Click for a video of sites and sounds of the sealions

Click for a video of sites and sounds of the sealions

Several branded sealions here today:

At this time of year there are some non-breeding plumage Heermann’s gulls that one can pick out among the large gull population .

And a gallery of some of the other bird-life on the island, some migrating through.

9 whalewatching boats through the reserve this morning.  Swells and the approaching storm held them off in the afternoon.

The panoramas below were taken in the last two days:

southislandpanosept2113a

Gulls on the south islands in the morning. Note a mix of California, Glaucous-winged   and Heermann’s Gulls.

swPanosept2213a

Glaucous-winged, California,   and a few  Heermann’s Gulls and sea lions on the south-west corner of the island

southsidepanosept2213a

The south side of Great Race Rock island

West side of the docks--note electric fence installed to keep the sealions off the docks.

West side of the docks–note electric fence installed to keep the sealions off the docks.

East side of jetty

East side of jetty

The east shore of Race Rocks with California and Northern Sea lions.

The east shore of Race Rocks with California and Northern Sea lions.

On Sunday morning, the Davis weather instrument wasn’t working. On checking, I found that the UPC powerbackup was malfunctioning–will return it to the college IT dept.  Weather is back on now.